Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from May, 2016

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - Rede Rose - Rose Custard

There are a number of dishes in Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 Thomas Austin, which make a pudding, or custard flavored with edible flowers. I interpreted the recipe for Rede Rose, which creates a lovely rose flavored custard, that would be wonderful for a vigil, or luncheon or served at the end of a meal. I have also included similar recipes found in the manuscript for Cviij - Prymerose, Cxxvij - Prymerose and .Cxxviij. Flowrys of hawþorn which I have not interpreted, partly because, they say "to create this dish in the same manner as vyolette", and partly because I do not currently have access to primroses or hawthorn flowers. 
For more information on the kinds of flowers that were eaten, and thus, a way to add considerable variation to this simple dish, please visit Agnes deLanvallei's "Medieval Herbs We Grow Chiefly as Flo…

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - Pumpes - Meatballs in Almond Milk

Here is another meatball recipe from Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 Thomas Austin.  This is very pretty to look at, but without salt or pepper the dish is a bit on the bland side.  My guess is that the majority of the seasoning would come from whatever seasonings might have been used in the pork when it was cooked.  I used ground raw pork to make the meatballs, and would highly suggest that you add additional seasoning then just clove and mace (I did).  
.Cxxxviij. Pumpes.—Take an sethe a gode gobet of Porke, & noȝt to lene, as tendyr as þou may; þan take hem vppe & choppe hem as smal as þou may; þan take clowes & Maces, & choppe forth with-alle, & Also choppe forth with Roysonys of coraunce; þan take hem & rolle hem as round as þou may, lyke to smale pelettys, a .ij. inches a-bowte, þan ley hem on a dysshe be hem selue; þan …

Harleian MS 279 (ab 1430) -lvj. Poumes - Meat Dumplings

One of the more unusual recipes that I ran across in Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 Thomas Austin is a recipe for a spiced meatball made of veal that is first cooked in water, and then roasted on a spit and covered with green batter.  I had to try it and I am glad I did. These were good!! They tasted quite a bit like deep fried mincemeat pies and I wish I would have amped up the spicing a bit more.  They were easy to make, and the fussiest part of making them was dipping each one individually in the batter and then tossing them into the fryer.  These have made it onto the "must try at a future feast" list.
I chose to fry the batter coated meatballs instead of trying to roast them on a spit. The reason I chose to fry the meatballs instead of spit roasting is because I don't have a spit roaster. I was afraid if I tried to imitate a spit …

Harleian MS. 279 (ab. 1430) - Gaylede - Rice Porridge with Figs & Honey

It would be easy to pass over this recipe if you were looking for one of the more exciting period dishes, but to do so, would be a disservice. Gaylede is one of a number of almond milk and rice flour based recipes that you can find in the pottage section of Harleian MS. 279. The completed dish is very pretty; the sandalwood adds a very pretty pink color to the recipe, while the ginger and galingale provide a warm spice. Ideally, the medieval cook would serve this at the beginning of a meal because it fit in with the ideology that foods which were easily digestible, along with sugar and warm spices would prepare the stomach for the important job of digestion. Most of us would probably want to start our days with this cereal like dish. Either way, I encourage you to try it. 
This dish is interesting in that it calls for either sugar or honey to be used as a sweetener and it is the first time that I have seen this references in the Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS.…