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Showing posts from February, 2017

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - .xlij. Conyng, Mawlard, in gely or in cyuey - Hen in Onion Sauce

Many moons ago, when I was first active in the SCA, I came across an excellent recipe in "The Ordinance of Pottage" for a dish called "Hare in Cyve" which I highly recommend.  It was very well received and became one of my "go to" feast dishes.  Hey, we all have them, right?  So when I found this recipe in Two fifteenth-century cookery-books. Harleian ms. 279 (ab. 1430), & Harl. ms. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole ms. 1429, Laud ms. 553, & Douce ms. 55" Thomas Austin it was very exciting for me.  Conyng is a reference to a young rabbit, while Mawlard most likely refers to Mallard, a duck.  Cyuey refers to a sauce that has been thickened by finely chopped onions or has been flavored with onions.  This is delicious and I am so glad to find that it can extend to duck and hen (chicken) as well as rabbit.  I urge you to try it!

The taste testers enjoyed this dish.  One comment was "I would lick the bowl but I'm trying to be p…

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - .xxxvij. Autre Vele en bokenade.-Another Veal in Bokenade (stewed)

It's a gray day today, cloudy with a promise of rain. The kind of day that makes you want to curl up with a good book and some comfort food and stay indoors. So I went in search of a recipe that would fall into the category of "yummy comfort food" from Two fifteenth-century cookery-books. Harleian ms. 279 (ab. 1430), & Harl. ms. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole ms. 1429, Laud ms. 553, & Douce ms. 55" Thomas Austin and found another recipe for another bokenade.  My previously published version for Henne in Bokenade netted rave reviews from the taste testers, so I was eager to give this version an attempt and we were not disappointed.  
The taste testers and I each enjoyed this dish. It is a bit reminiscent of .vj. Beef y-Stywyd evoking the warmed spice flavors of Cincinnati style chili, without the acidic bite of vinegar.  This is a milder version and has made it onto the ever growing list of things that must be served at an event. Although, with…

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - .lj. Cawdelle de Almaunde - Almond Caudle

I cannot believe that this recipe has been kept hidden away and secret and has not been used more often at events in the past.  Cawdelle de Almaunde, from  Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 by Thomas Austin, is a thick, rich beer soup, or, more recently, if you choose not to follow the instructions, a warmed drink mainly used in the Middle Ages for invalids.  Whatever you call it, you should try it--just make sure you use an ale (or beer) that you enjoy drinking.

One of the taste testers declared it "not to their taste", because it wasn't the "beer" flavor they were expecting.  That makes sense, because you are tempering the beer with almond milk, giving it a creamy taste.  After a few moments of discussion, we had decided that if you were to make this and serve it as instructed "al hotte in maner of potage", that you…

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - .lviij. Let lory - Larded Milk

Let Lory is a fun and delicious recipe from  Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 by Thomas Austin. Milk and eggs are cooked until they form curds that are then drained, and served with sweetened custard.  The first time I made this dish I didn't use a double boiler to heat my milk and burned it.  This recipe is an example of custard that has been cooked until it forms curds. The instructions to heat the milk until it boils ensure that it curds and doesn't form a smooth pudding. While these kinds of custards appear to be quite popular during the 15th Century, they seem to have fallen out of favor in the 16th Century and disappear completely by the 17th Century. 
What we know is that some of the earliest documentable recipes for custards can be found in De Re Coquinaria. The dish is called "Tyropatinam", and consists of milk, eggs and ho…

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - .Ciiij. Bolas - Poached Pears in Plum Sauce

I have been quite anxious to try this recipe from Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 by Thomas Austin for Bolas. It was exactly as I imagined it would be...colorful, flavorful and with a bit of a cheat, exceptionally easy to put together. Additionally, this dish wowed the taste testers when presented. 
.Ciiij. Bolas.—Take fayre Bolasse, wasshe hem clene, & in Wyne boyle hem þat þey be but skaldyd bywese, & boyle hem alle to pomppe,*. [Pulp. ] & draw hem þorw a straynoure, & a-lye hem with flowre of Rys, & make it chargeaunt, & do it to þe fyre, & boyl it; take it of, & do þer-to whyte Sugre, gyngere, Clowys, Maces, Canelle, & stere it wyl to-gederys: þanne take gode perys, [leaf 19 bk.] & sethe hem wel with þe Stalke, & sette hem to kele, & pare hem clene, and pyke owt þe corys; þan take datis, & wa…

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - .Cv. Lorey de Boolas - Plum Curd

This recipe from Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 by Thomas Austin was quite a surprise for me. The finished product is a beautiful rose colored, piquant fruit "curd". It might even be the precursor to modern day fruit curds. It lacks the butter that you would find in modern day curds, replacing it with bread crumbs. It also lacks sugar; the recipe specifies that you are to use skimmed honey. 
The taste testers were quite pleased with this dish, and this is something I plan on making in the future to give away as gifts. I also imagine that you could use it with other fruits; berries, apricots, lemon.

What is a fruit curd? It is a spread or a topping that in modern day is served with scones, bread, cheesecake, etc. I'm not sure it would have been a good keeping recipe, despite the wine and the honey that was added to it. If I were t…