Friday, May 20, 2016

Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430) - Pumpes - Meatballs in Almond Milk

Pumpes - Meatballs in Almond Milk
Here is another meatball recipe from Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab 1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS. 1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 Thomas Austin.  This is very pretty to look at, but without salt or pepper the dish is a bit on the bland side.  My guess is that the majority of the seasoning would come from whatever seasonings might have been used in the pork when it was cooked.  I used ground raw pork to make the meatballs, and would highly suggest that you add additional seasoning then just clove and mace (I did).  

.Cxxxviij. Pumpes.—Take an sethe a gode gobet of Porke, & noȝt to lene, as tendyr as þou may; þan take hem vppe & choppe hem as smal as þou may; þan take clowes & Maces, & choppe forth with-alle, & Also choppe forth with Roysonys of coraunce; þan take hem & rolle hem as round as þou may, lyke to smale pelettys, a .ij. inches a-bowte, þan ley hem on a dysshe be hem selue; þan make a gode Almaunde mylke, & a lye it with floure of Rys, & lat it boyle wyl, but loke þat it be clene rennyng; & at þe dressoure, ley .v. pompys in a dysshe, & pore þin potage þer-on. An ȝif þou wolt, sette on euery pompe a flos campy*. [? field-flower. ] flour, & a-boue straw on Sugre y-now, & Maces: & serue hem forth. And sum men make þe pellettys of vele or Beeff, but porke ys beste & fayrest.

Cxxxviij - Pumpes. Take an sethe a gode gobet of Porke, and no3t to lene, as tendyr as thou may; than take hem vppe and choppe hem as smal as thou may; than take clowes and Maces, and choppe forth with-alle, and Also choppe forth with Roysonys of coraunce; than take hem and rolle hem as round as thou may, lyke to smale pelettys, a .ij. inches a-bowte, than ley hem on a dysshe be hem selue; than make a gode Almaunde mylke, and a lye it with floure of Rys, and lat it boyle wyl, but loke that it be clene rennyng; and at the dressoure, ley .v. pompys in a dysshe, and pore thin potage ther-on. An 3if thou wolt, sette on euery pompe a flos campy (Note: ? field-flower) flour, and a-boue straw on Sugre y-now, and Maces: and serue hem forth. And sum men make the pellettys of vele or Beeff, but porkeys beste and fayrest.

38. Pumpes - Take and boil a good piece of pork, and not to lean, as tender as you may; then take them up and chop them as small as you may; then take cloves and maces, and chop forth with all, and also chop forth with raisins of Corance; then take them and roll them as round as you may, like to small pellets, a 2 inches about, then lay them on a dish by themselves; then make a good almond milk, and mix it with flour of rice, and let it boil well but look that it be clean running; and when you go to serve lay five meatballs in a dish and pour your broth thereon. And if you will, set on every meatball a field flower (wild campion - a small red flower), and above strew on sugar enough and maces; and serve them forth.  And some men make the pellets of veal or beef, but pork best and fairest.

The Middle English Dictionary, Volume 6 by Hans Kurath defines the flos campy flour as "a special flour and hath that name for he groweth by himself in places that be nought tilled...and is a litil flour with a small talk and the flour is reed as blood." 


Interpreted Recipe Serves                                                                                1 as main, 2 as side

1/4 pound ground pork
1/8 tsp. clove and mace
1 tbsp. raisins
1 c. almond milk
2 tbsp. rice flour
Small red flowers (I used red dianthus (known as clove gillyflower in period))
Pinch of sugar and mace to garnish

Mix together pork, clove, mace, raisins (and any additional seasoning you may wish), and then shape the meat into a ball. I did add an egg to bind it together. Drop the meatballs into a pan of cool water and bring to boil. Cook until they are cooked thoroughly. While the meatballs are cooking bring the almond milk and rice to boil and let thicken. I like thicker gravy, so I made this with 2 tbsp. of rice flour. When the milk has thickened and the meatballs are cooked, place them into a bowl and garnish with small red flowers. Before serving sprinkle with a pinch of sugar and mace. The flowers will wilt very quickly so do not place them until you are ready to serve the dish.

As I stated above, this was a very bland dish, additional seasoning is required, at the very least salt and pepper to make it better for the modern pallet. This would have been very good if the same seasoning that had been used in the lvj. Poumes recipe had been used. As written, this was one of the more disappointing, albeit pretty dishes that I have made to date. I would very much like to hear if someone else tries this, what seasonings they may have used. I will most likely try this again, using the same seasoning mix as Poumes. This was such an easy and simple dish to prepare that I would like to see it at a future feast.

Similar Recipes:

153. Pumpes - Take beef, pork or veal, one of them and raw, all together chop it then grind them in a mortar as small as you may, then cast thereto raw yolks of eggs, wine, and a little white sugar: caste also thereto powder pepper and mace, cloves, cubebs, powder cinnamon and salt and a little saffron; then take and make small pellets round enough, and look that you have a fair pot of fresh broth of beef or of capon and ever throw them thereon and let them seethe till they be enough; then take and draw up a thrifty milk of almonds, with cold fresh broth of beef, veal, mutton or capon, and thicken it with rice flour and with spices; and at the table, lay the pellets five or six in a dish and then pour the syrup on it and serve it, or else, make a good syrup and lay the pellet thereon and good service

Pumpes - Dan Myers' Recipe at Medieval Cookery